Social Media Question Asking (SMQA)

SMQA

SNS Search in Developing Countries

we focus on a how SNS search varies in developed and developing regions of the world and why. With established statistics of usage, we provided insight that one might require to consider while developing any application for SNS based searching

Understanding Context in SMQA: A Practice Approach

we took a ‘practice’ lens to examine existing works along with real life data of queries in a popular social network to see if the practice model fits into the broader contextual factors and associated values.

Tagging 'Friends' in SMQA

We take and mixed method approach to understand whom do we tag for our questions in Facebook post, and why.



Publications

Using Social Network Sites (SNS) as an information source has drawn the attention of the researchers for a while now. There have been many works that analyzed the types and topics of questions people ask in these networks and why. Topics like what motivate people to answer such queries, how to integrate the traditional search engines and SNS together are also well investigated. In this paper, we focus on a relevant but novel issue - how SNS search varies in developed and developing regions of the world and why. Analyzing 880 status messages collected from a widely used SNS, we have observed that, unavailability and inadequacy of information on web in developing countries play a significant role to motivate users using SNS for information retrieval. With established statistics of Internet usage, e-Governance, and our experimental data analysis, we have tried to emphasize the differences between social search and traditional web-search and provided insight that one might require to consider while developing any application for SNS based searching.
Using Social Network Sites (SNS) as an information source has drawn the attention of the researchers for a while now. There has been many works that analyzed the types and topics of questions people ask in these networks and why. Topics like what motivate people to answer such queries, how to integrate the traditional search engines and SNS together are also well investigated. In this paper, we focus on a relevant but different issue - how SNS search varies in developed and developing regions of the world and why. With established statistics of Internet usage, e-Governance, and our experimental data collection, we have tried to emphasize the differences among them and provided insight that one might require to consider while developing any application for SNS based searching.
The last decade has seen the emergence of the social networking sites (SNS) and researchers are investigating the useful applications of this technology in various areas apart from its recreational value. Ubiquitous presence of SNS has enabled us to obtain customized information seamlessly from our acquaintance. There have been many works that analyzed the types and topics of questions people ask in these networks and why. Topics like what motivates people to answer such queries, how to integrate the traditional search engines, and SNS together are also well investigated. In this research, we focus on the use of this technology in underdeveloped parts of the world and the new doors it has opened for its inhabitants in terms of obtaining information. Analyzing 880 status messages collected from a widely used SNS, we have observed that, unavailability and inadequacy of information on web in developing countries play a significant role to motivate users using SNS for information retrieval. Based on a structured survey on 328 persons, we have tried to emphasize the differences between social search and traditional web search. Our statistical analysis finds the correlations among different relevant parameters and provides insight that one might require to consider while developing any application for SNS-based searching.

Our Team

I worked with couple of our enthusiastic students, who made this research possible

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Hasan Shahid Ferdous

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Saif Ahmed


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Mashrura Tasnim




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Md. Tanvir Alam Anik